How can publishers overcome misinformation?

The internet and social media have given those looking to spread false information the ability to write, publish and disseminate material at the touch of a button.

With access to millions of people who interact with these posts, misinformation is able to sway political opinion, push agendas and often make the authors money fast.

“The radical decentralisation of who gets to publish has combined in a very dangerous way with this phenomenon of our living in segmented bubbles, following and liking the sources that we trust and being drawn to news that we are already sympathetic or inclined to,” said Sewell Chan, international news editor, London, at The New York Times, speaking at the ‘Post truth and alternative facts’ event in London.

“The combination of how anyone can produce content, with how we consume and share it, is very volatile right now.”

So what can news organisations do to tackle the negative impact that disinformation may have on the journalism industry, and the relationship publishers have with their audiences?

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